Schedule

*Assignments and readings should always be completed before the class session on which they are listed. Screenings will take place during the class session. Readings come from the required text (Gelder, Subcultures) and the provided PDFs.

Week 1 (9/4/13): Introductions

Objectives

  • Get acquainted with each other
  • Go over course outline
  • Get set up on WordPress and Twitter

Assignments

  • Accept invitation to WordPress site
  • Set up Twitter account to be used with this course

Readings

  • All content on course website

Screenings

  • None

Week 2 (9/11/13): Defining subcultures and social movements

Objectives

  • Establish theoretical framework for thinking about subcultures, social movements, and representation

Assignments

  • 1 tweet announcing that you’ll be tweeting for this class
  • 1 tweet in response to this week’s readings
  • 1 free tweet

Readings

  • “Introduction” from Subcultures: Cultural Histories and Social Practice, Ken Gelder (pp. 1-4)
  • “Subcultures: A Vagabond History” from Subcultures, Ken Gelder (pp. 5-26)
  • “Introduction” from The Art of Protest: Culture and Activism from the Civil Rights Movement to the Streets of Seattle, T.V. Reed (pp. xiii-xix)
  • “Reflections on the Cultural Study of Social Movements” from The Art of Protest, T.V. Reed (pp. 296-315)
  • “The Work of Representation,” Stuart Hall (pp. 15-74; skip activities but do the additional readings A-F as they are called for in the text)

Screenings

  • none

Week 3 (9/18/13): Documentary representations / Evangelical Christianity

Objectives

  • Review defining characteristics of subcultures and social movements
  • Further explore the construction of reality through representation
  • Recognize argument construction in documentary film
  • Consider ethical issues in media representation

Assignments

  • 1 tweet @replying a classmate
  • 1 tweet in response to this week’s readings
  • 1 free tweet

Readings

  • Representing Reality, Bill Nichols (pp. 34-8; 44-56; 76-89; 107-12; 125-32; 185-91; 196-8)
  • Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory, Randall Balmer (pp. ix-xii; 92-108; 109-137 optional; 227-35)

Screenings

  • Jesus Camp

Week 4 (9/25/13): Documenting marginal groups / Fan cultures

Objectives

  • Critique representations of marginal subcultures
  • Understand relationship between popular culture and subculture

Assignments

  • 1 tweet @replying a classmate
  • 1 tweet in response to last week’s screening/discussion
  • 1 tweet in response to this week’s reading
  • 1 tweet responding to a tweet with the #RaceWorkProject hashtag
  • Research topic ideas
  • Week 3 blog post due 24 hours before class

Readings

  • “Utopian Enterprise: Articulating the Meaning of Star Trek‘s Culture of Consumption,” Robert V. Kozinets (pp. 67-88)
  • Star Trek Rerun, Reread, Rewritten: Fan Writing as Textual Poaching,” Henry Jenkins, (pp. 448-71)
  • “Fans, Networks, Pirates: Virtual and Media Subcultures,” from Subcultures, Ken Gelder (pp. 140-58)

Screenings

  • Trekkies

Week 5 (10/2/13): Resistance and containment / Punk youth

Objectives

  • Understand ideological relationship between deviant subcultures and dominant culture
  • Explore tactics of resistance by subcultures, including DIY media
  • Recognize tactics of containment by dominant media, including moral panics

Assignments

  • 1 tweet @replying a classmate
  • 1 tweet in response to last week’s screening/discussion
  • 1 tweet in response to this week’s reading
  • 1 free tweet
  • Week 4 blog post due 24 hours before class

Readings

  • “The Chicago School and After: Sociology, Deviance, and Social Worlds,” from Subcultures, Ken Gelder (pp. 27-46)
  • “Subcultures and Cultural Studies: Community, Class, and Style at Birmingham and Beyond,” from Subcultures, Ken Gelder (pp. 83-106)
  • Subculture: The Meaning of Style, Dick Hebdige (pp. 84-9; 106-12)
  • The Philosophy of Punk, Craig O’Hara (pp. 62-9)
  • Notes from Underground, Stephen Duncombe (pp. 45-8; 66-78; 123-36)
  • recommended: “Bar Scenes and Club Cultures: Sociality, Excess, Utopia” from Subcultures, Ken Gelder (pp. 47-65)

Screenings

  • The Filth and the Fury

Week 6 (10/9/13): Commodification and diffusion / Tattoo communities

Objectives

  • Understand processes by which subcultures become incorporated into mainstream culture
  • Recognize and critique discourses of authenticity and “selling out”
  • Analyze commercial representations of spectacular subcultures

Assignments

  • 1 tweet @replying a classmate
  • 1 tweet in response to last week’s screening/discussion
  • 1 tweet in response to this week’s reading
  • 1 free tweet
  • Research topics due
  • Week 5 blog post due 24 hours before class

Readings

  • Club Cultures: Music, Media and Subcultural Capital, Sarah Thornton (pp. 116-62; 137-51 optional)
  • Bodies of Inscription: A Cultural History of the Modern Tattoo Community, Margo DeMello (pp. 97-135)
  • “Performing the Real: Documentary Diversions,” John Corner (pp. 255-69)

Screenings

  • Ink Master, Season 3, Episode 1

Week 7 (10/16/13): News coverage and media framing / Leftist movements

Objectives

  • Understand goals and strategies of political movements
  • Understand ideological and material constraints of journalistic media
  • Recognize how movements and news media depend on and shape each other’s practices

Assignments

  • 1 tweet @replying a classmate
  • 1 tweet in response to last week’s screening/discussion
  • 1 tweet in response to this week’s reading
  • 1 free tweet
  • Week 6 blog post due 24 hours before class

Readings

  • The Whole World is Watching, Todd Gitlin (pp. 1-31; 34-5; 42-5; 98-102; 140-56; 166-9; 182-3; 230-8; 242-6; 252-69 – review if you need a refresher on hegemony theory)

Screenings

  • Occupy Wall Street guest panel

Week 8 (10/23/13): Final project progress

Objectives

  • Make progress on final project research

Assignments

  • 1 tweet @replying a classmate
  • 1 tweet in response to last week’s screening/discussion
  • 1 tweet about your final project research
  • 1 free tweet
  • 1 blog comment must be posted by this date (125 words)
  • Preliminary bibliography due
  • Week 7 blog post due 24 hours before class

Readings

  • Sources on your chosen topic

Screenings

  • Library resources guest speaker + tour

Week 9 (10/30/13): Self-representation and movement networks / Anarchism and Global Justice movements

Objectives

  • Compare how movements represent themselves to themselves and to outsiders
  • Explore movement representation in multiple mediums (print, broadcast, and digital)
  • Recognize and problematize cultural expressions of movement values

Assignments

  • 1 tweet @replying a classmate
  • 1 tweet about your final project research
  • 1 tweet in response to this week’s reading
  • 1 free tweet

Readings

  • “The Globalization Movement and the New Left,” David Graeber
  • “Will the Revolution be Cybercast? New Media, the Battle of Seattle, and Global Justice,” from The Art of Protest, T.V. Reed (pp. 240-9; 249-54 optional; 254-81; 281-5 optional)
  • Lifestyle Politics and Radical Activism, Laura Portwood-Stacer (pp. 1-11 optional; 11-24)
  • Notes from Underground, Stephen Duncombe (pp. 30-45)
  • “Dear Punk Rock Activism,” Andy Cornell (pp. 69-75)

Screenings

  • Guest speaker Andrew Cornell
  • Field trip to ABC No Rio Zine Library

Week 10 (11/6/13): Stylistic strategies and co-optation / Black Power

Objectives

  • Understand tactics of media spectacle for militant movements
  • Contextualize corporate co-optation of movement styles and other cultural practices

Assignments

  • 1 tweet @replying a classmate
  • 1 tweet in response to last week’s screening/discussion
  • 1 tweet in response to this week’s reading (also use #RaceWorkProject hashtag)
  • 1 free tweet
  • Week 9 blog post due 24 hours before class

Readings

  • Racial Formation in the United States, Michael Omi and Howard Winant (pp. 95-112)
  • “Scenarios for Revolution: The Drama of the Black Panthers,” from The Art of Protest, T.V. Reed (pp. 40-74)
  • New Day in Babylon: The Black Power Movement and American Culture, 1965-1975, William L. VanDeburg (pp. 192-224)

Screenings

  • TBD (suggestions welcome)

Week 11 (11/13/13): Polysemy and intersectionality / Feminism

Objectives

  • Understand the concepts of consciousness raising, intersectional identities, and interlocking oppressions
  • Relate entertainment media representations to discourses of individualism
  • Consider the multiple meanings and values representations may hold for different audiences

Assignments

  • 1 tweet @replying a classmate
  • 1 tweet in response to last week’s screening/discussion
  • 1 tweet in response to this week’s reading
  • 1 free tweet
  • Outline + annotated bibliography & “mediagraphy” due
  • Week 10 blog post due 24 hours before class

Readings

  • Personal Politics: The Roots of Women’s Liberation in the Civil Rights Movement and the New Left, Sara Evans (pp. 212-32)
  • “A Black Feminist Statement,” The Combahee River Collective (pp. 63-70)
  • Prime-Time Feminism: Television, Media Culture, and the Women’s Movement since 1970, Bonnie J. Dow (pp. 24-58)
  • “The Rhetorical Limits of Polysemy,” Celeste Michelle Condit (pp. 426-47)

Screenings

  • prime-time television programs TBA (probably Parks and Recreation, “Women in Garbage”)

Week 12 (11/20/13): Entertainment and individualism / Gay liberation

Objectives

  • Further connect mediated entertainment with celebrity and individualist ideology
  • Compare documentary and feature film representations
  • Outlines returned in class

Assignments

  • 1 tweet @replying a classmate
  • 1 tweet in response to last week’s screening/discussion
  • 1 tweet in response to this week’s reading
  • 1 free tweet
  • 2nd blog comment must be posted by this date

Readings

  • “Gay Politics, Gay Community: San Francisco’s Experience,” John D’Emilio (pp. 74-95)
  • Review The Whole World is Watching, Todd Gitlin (pp. 146-56; 166-8)
  • View The Times of Harvey Milk on your own before class (on reserve at Bobst Avery Fisher center)

Screenings

  • Milk

Week 13 (11/27/13): Catch-up week (no class scheduled)

Objectives

  • Make progress on final project research

Assignments

  • Tweets about your research / @replying classmates
  • Rough draft of all written content due via email

Readings

  • Just your research sources

Screenings

  • none

Week 14 (12/4/13): Presentation day

Objectives

  • Share your projects with your classmates
  • Get feedback for your final pages
  • Rough drafts returned in class

Assignments

  • Tweets about your research / @replying classmates
  • Skeleton of webpage w/ as much content as you have (include placeholders for all other planned content)

Readings

  • none

Screenings

  • Classmates’ projects

Final project due Wednesday 12/11/13 by 4:55pm

  • You must have 50 total tweets by this day
  • Final webpage must be posted
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